Structural typing and first-class case expressions

by

This blog is an excerpt from a little paper I’m working on atm, showing a little case where structural typing is superior than nominal typing.

Background knowledge

Consider (Haskell-ish pseudo-code):

Guy  = { age : Int }
Girl = { age : Int }

sticky :: Guy
sticky = { age = 19 }

fingers :: Girl
fingers = sticky

This code:

Main content

Consider this AST:

data Exp
  = BLit Bool
  | If Exp Exp Exp
  | Not Exp
  | Or Exp Exp
  | And Exp Exp -- Boolean

  | ILit Int
  | Add Exp Exp
  | Neg Exp
  | Sub Exp Exp -- Integer

Assume the constructed Exp are always well-typed (there are many ways to make a promise on type-level, like GADT. It’s omitted here for simplicity), we can have an interpreter on it:

eval (BLit n)   = BLit n
eval (If c a b) = let (BLit c)         = eval c in eval $ if c then a else b
eval (Not a)    = let (BLit a)         = eval a in BLit $ not a
eval (Or a b)   = let (BLit a, BLit b) = (eval a, eval b) in BLit $ a || b
eval (And a b)  = let (BLit a, BLit b) = (eval a, eval b) in BLit $ a && b

eval (ILit n)   = ILit n
eval (Neg a)    = let (ILit a)         = eval a in ILit (- a)
eval (Add a b)  = let (ILit a, ILit b) = (eval a, eval b) in ILit $ a + b
eval (Sub a b)  = let (ILit a, ILit b) = (eval a, eval b) in ILit $ a - b

For code modularization we may want to split them into two functions, one for Bool-relevant cases and one for Int-relevant functions (this is actually a very practical need):

evalB (BLit n)   = BLit n
evalB (If c a b) = let (BLit c)         = eval c in eval $ if c then a else b
evalB (Not a)    = let (BLit a)         = eval a in BLit $ not a
evalB (Or a b)   = let (BLit a, BLit b) = (eval a, eval b) in BLit $ a || b
evalB (And a b)  = let (BLit a, BLit b) = (eval a, eval b) in BLit $ a && b
-- warning: `evalB` is not exhaustive!

evalI (ILit n)   = ILit n
evalI (Neg a)    = let (ILit a)         = eval a in ILit (- a)
evalI (Add a b)  = let (ILit a, ILit b) = (eval a, eval b) in ILit $ a + b
evalI (Sub a b)  = let (ILit a, ILit b) = (eval a, eval b) in ILit $ a - b
-- warning: `evalI` is not exhaustive!

eval = evalB OR evalI
-- error: there is not such OR operation in Haskell :(

The eval above is not possible in nominal-typed languages such as Haskell, unless we define a number of other data types representing possible subsets of Exp (in our case it should be (BLit | If | Or | And | Not) and (ILit | Neg | Add | Neg | Sub)) and a bunch of auxiliary functions that convert instances of each data type back and forth.

Plus, without the “subset” data types we’ll get exhaustiveness warnings under nominal type system.

Something you may come up with

FWIW, you can write this (under Haskell’s nominal type system):

evalB ... (original code)
evalB other      = evalI other

evalI ... (original code)
evalI other      = evalB other

However, this is possible only because we have two functions. If we’ve modularize eval into three parts, you won’t be able to do this.

Structural typing

However, in structurally-typed languages, we will not need those subset-data types, exhaustiveness warnings and conversion functions, and our evalB/evalI will have types:

evalB :: BLit | If | Or | And | Not -> Exp
evalI :: ILit | Neg | Add | Neg | Sub -> ILit

but eventually a re-dispatch is still required:

eval (BLit n)   = evalB (BLit n)
eval (If c a b) = evalB (If c a b)
eval (Not a)    = evalB (Not a)
eval (Or a b)   = evalB (Or a b)
eval (And a b)  = evalB (And a b)

eval (ILit n)   = evalI (ILit n)
eval (Neg a)    = evalI (Neg a)
eval (Add a b)  = evalI (Add a b)
eval (Sub a b)  = evalI (Sub a b)

This is too much boilerplate (the code above does not contain any nontrivial information, but the eval function can only be written in this way, if we only change Haskell from nominal-typed to structurally-typed, and don’t introduce any new language features).

New feature

But of course we can use some additional language feature to support this!

Imagine a strip off operation that “eliminates one variant away from a data type”, denoted as:

case BLit n: evalB (BLit n)
or other clauses

, we can achieve boilerplate-free modularization. In case there is no cases to eliminate, we introduce a whatever keyword as the eliminator for the empty variant type.

Rewriting the original code using the strip off operation will be:

eval = case BLit n: BLit n
  or case If c a b: let (BLit c) = eval c in if c then eval a else eval b
  or case Not a: let (BLit a)           = eval a in BLit $ not a
  or case Or a b: let (BLit a, BLit b)  = (eval a, eval b) in BLit (a || b)
  or case And a b: let (BLit a, BLit b) = (eval a, eval b) in BLit (a && b)
  or case ILit n: ILit n
  or case Neg a: let (ILit a)           = eval a in ILit (- a)
  or case Add a b: let (ILit a, ILit b) = (eval a, eval b) in ILit (a + b)
  or case Sub a b: let (ILit a, ILit b) = (eval a, eval b) in ILit (a - b)
  or whatever

Modularize it (it’s nothing but parametrization):

evalB f = case BLit n: BLit n
  or case Not a: let (BLit a)           = eval a in BLit $ not a
  or case Or a b: let (BLit a, BLit b)  = (eval a, eval b) in BLit (a || b)
  or case And a b: let (BLit a, BLit b) = (eval a, eval b) in BLit (a && b)
  or f
evalI f = case ILit n: ILit n
  or case Neg a: let (ILit a)           = eval a in ILit (- a)
  or case Add a b: let (ILit a, ILit b) = (eval a, eval b) in ILit (a + b)
  or case Sub a b: let (ILit a, ILit b) = (eval a, eval b) in ILit (a - b)
  or f

And there should be a function connecting evalB and evalI together:

eval = evalB (evalI whatever)

This feature is available in the MLPolyR language and the Rose language.

@LdBeth (together with me) had made some effort to make MLPolyR compile with MLton and have created a GitHub repo so it’s now accessible from everywhere.

In the MLPolyR language, the strip off operation is called “first-class cases”.

Tweet this
Top


Create an issue to apply for commentary

License

This work (Structural typing and first-class case expressions) is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

License